Up, Up, and No Helium

Flyers+like+this+adorned+the+halls+of+PAHS+for+the+last+few+years.+AID%27s+balloon+release+has+been+a+popular+event+with+the+students.+The+tradition+had+to+be+cancelled+because+of+the+lack+of+helium.+
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Up, Up, and No Helium

Flyers like this adorned the halls of PAHS for the last few years. AID's balloon release has been a popular event with the students. The tradition had to be cancelled because of the lack of helium.

Flyers like this adorned the halls of PAHS for the last few years. AID's balloon release has been a popular event with the students. The tradition had to be cancelled because of the lack of helium.

Flyers like this adorned the halls of PAHS for the last few years. AID's balloon release has been a popular event with the students. The tradition had to be cancelled because of the lack of helium.

Flyers like this adorned the halls of PAHS for the last few years. AID's balloon release has been a popular event with the students. The tradition had to be cancelled because of the lack of helium.

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For the past few years, AID has organized a release of balloons to show awareness for breast cancer and the people suffering. Students and faculty paid two dollars to dedicate each balloon. The release raised money for the fight against cancer. The survivors and the others who weren’t so lucky and lost their fight were remembered during this event. Sadly, the tradition cannot take place this year because of the helium shortage. 

Worldwide, there is a global scarcity of helium. The reason for this is because it’s a byproduct from big chemical reactions and is generally not produced as a primary product. It is also very expensive and needs specific environments to be kept in. Helium also develops underneath Earth’s crust, but very slowly.

Alternatives to the balloon release have been put into consideration because of how balloons impact the environment and the fact there is a shortage of helium.

Miss Coleman, adviser of the AID club, said, “At the moment we are looking to sell Pura Vida bracelets. We want to come up with new ways to bring in more money. We want to do something different from the balloon release and we agreed as a club to move away from anything that is harmful to the environment.” 

Some students aren’t happy with the decision to cancel the balloon release. Many feel that it brings happiness and joy to people suffering from the disease. 

Senior Janna Androshick said, “I think it’s a good thing because it’s kind of like a tradition that we do it every year and it’s very depressing that we aren’t. I personally like the balloon release because it brings awareness to this awful disease.” 

Senior McKenzie Mozloom said, “I’m rather sad that they are not doing the balloon release because it brings joy to people who have family members that are suffering from cancer. I remember seeing people in the crowd smiling because of the excitement that it brings to them.”

On the other hand, some teachers do not mind the fact that the event will not take place because of the harm it does to the environment. 

Mr. Lucas Bricker said, “I like what the balloon release stands for but I think they could do something that would have less of an impact of the environment. They should substitute something instead of the balloons like candles.” 

AID is continuing to come up with new ways to honor the survivors and raise money for breast cancer.

 

In an earlier version of this story, we incorrectly named Miss Meredith Coleman as Mrs. Meredith Coleman. Additionally, we incorrectly listed the price of the balloons as $1 each instead of $2 each. We apologize for both errors.

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